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  Do you consider IBS to be a disability, condition, disease, illness?

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Author Topic:   Do you consider IBS to be a disability, condition, disease, illness?
daybyday
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Posts: 22
Registered: Aug 99

posted 08-25-1999 10:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for daybyday   Click Here to Email daybyday     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is IBS considered a disability? I feel very disabled at times and wish I didn't have to work full time. I sometimes wish I could go on disability. What do you feel IBS is? I dont talk about it to some people because they just can't imagine that your system can't function normal. When some of my coworkers get a tummy virus they moan and complain and its the end of the world. I feel like I have virus a few times a week and I keep it quiet and deal with the pain. If I was to go home sick every time I felt sick I would have so many days out. Do doctors feel this is a disability?

Love
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posted 08-26-1999 01:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Love     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not sure what doctors think, but I think it is. I know what you mean about others and their stomachs. Just last week a co-worker went into the hospital to get tested for IBS when she had D for 2 days. She made it seem like such a joke.

Smile
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posted 08-26-1999 10:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Smile   Click Here to Email Smile     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How do you get tested for IBS?

Ty
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Posts: 288
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posted 08-26-1999 10:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ty   Click Here to Email Ty     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Smile - Unfortunately there isn't a test for IBS. Basically they run a battery of tests and procedures that can detect everything else except IBS. It's a process of elimination, which makes it more difficult for everyone else to accept IBS as the serious disorder/disability that it is.

Ty

zigmissus
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Posts: 232
Registered: May 99

posted 08-26-1999 12:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for zigmissus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Unfortunately, there's no clear answer to this one! I was on STATE disability for IBS for a year, but when that ran out, the FEDERAL government (Social Security Admin.) didn't agree that I had a disability. They turned me down on the grounds that I hadn't lost enough weight! My dictionary says that illness and disease have "a specific cause," so that may exclude IBS. I guess "syndrome" is the correct word, meaning a "characteristic set of symptoms." I can also think of a number of other descriptive terms for IBS that aren't fit to print here.

moldie
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posted 08-26-1999 01:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moldie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It pretty much boils down to how much IBS is affecting the functioning of your everyday life and how you can prove that it has by job and healthcare records. I am currently seeing a lawyer to try to collect disability surrounding my proctalgia problem. Since during this time period of about 4yrs I was afflicted with this 2-3 time a wk for 2-6hrs at a time; I felt that this was significant enough not to be able to hold down a job, much less function at home as a "homemaker."
I took a leave from my job when I started calling in sick and my records showed a vag and a bladder infection. When I began exhibiting bowel symptoms as well, that is when I quit work, in order to get a handle on my health, so it would not look too bad on my record for call-in absentees. The bowel problems only became increasingly worse, so I never returned to work. The whole thing snowballed from there from no diagnosis, misdiagnosis, unessasary surgery, to finding the right diagnosis and treatment to end my proctalgia symptoms. My lawyer thinks I have a case as she wouldn't have taken me- she only gets paid a percentage if I win my case. She does get paid for her expenses though. The difficulty comes as I am a private person and did not vocalize my discomfort and lack of functionability well, although there are doctors records that I sought help. They, however, did not record everything I told them, and their lack of being able to diagnose me, plus the fact that they looked at my depressed demeanor about the whole situation more than my physical situation, did not help me either. Before my appeal/lawyer procedings, Social Security had scheduled me to see a doc. to check me out again. To my misfortune, they gave me a young doc. who had done a paper on Candida and Diflucan discounting it(maybe it was flux- just kidding). This really hurt my case, since that is what my case was based on. All I have to rely on now is the doc. that successfully treated me. I hope he can convince them that what I went through was real and will have other sucessful cases to support his treatments.

I'm sorry to have gone on about my case like that daybyday. I hope that maybe you or someone else will be able to gain something from my experiences. My lawyer remarked that there are more cases won over IBS than FMS. If you can prove that your stooling problem affects you ability to maintain employment, you may have a case. What galls me is that my whole situation might have been avoided if my dermatologist wouldn't have prescribed that antibiotic for me, even after I told her that I had IBS and Fibro, and later Endo.. Like me, she didn't realize that antibiotics not only cause diarrhea temporaily, but can do damage to ones intestinal tract, enough to cause an eventual systemic problems, especially when one has an underlying condition. I am thinking about going back to work now since we need the money. I am a little scared. I hope that I will have the energy left as this whole experience set my FMS back. I also hope that my symptoms will not come back. Wish me luck. I wish you luck too daybyday.

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[This message has been edited by moldie (edited 08-26-99).]

crzymoma1
unregistered
posted 08-26-1999 02:36 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is a question for Moldie. How long ago did your dermatologist give you antibiotics, what type and how long did you take them? I took Tetracyclne for years as a teen. Went off them probably when I was about 16 or 17. I am now wondering if they could have some permanent damage to my GI tract that affect me now. Although my onset of IBS really became a problem abolut 7 years ago,& I'm in my 40's, I'm now wondering about the past affects from this drug. Any ideas. Thanks crzymoma1@aol.com

hmmmmmmmm
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posted 08-26-1999 07:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hmmmmmmmm     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I consider IBS to be a pain in the ass. Pun intended !! Actually after years and years it is just a fact of life !!

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τΏτ-whereever you go there you are

jade
unregistered
posted 08-26-1999 07:44 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think ibs is a disability , a disease, a rotten conditiion, and an illness. it is more disabling than a lot of diseases that qualify for disability. for those -higher ups who decide out lives--Come on in to the bathroom with me when ibs hits--then and only then decide what hell this is.

rockcandi1
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posted 08-26-1999 08:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for rockcandi1   Click Here to Email rockcandi1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
i think it should be a disability ! the mind and the gut part! i know of people who don't go through 1/2 as much as we do and they get SSI

flubug
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Posts: 80
Registered: Mar 99

posted 08-26-1999 09:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for flubug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi everyone,
I don't know how much this will help anyone but here goes. My mother-in-law who works for a law firm told me that it is easier to get SS or disability for Crohn's disease than it would be for IBS. Figures.......

Cheryl

moldie
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posted 08-26-1999 10:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moldie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm sorry crzymomma1, This is all so new to me, I have no concrete information to give you. For me it will be easier to prove as I was on antibioics for about a year before I started exhibiting the symptoms; vag, bladder, and bowel. Ironically none of the doctors who saw me (and there were a few within those couple of years) told me that my problems could be do to the antibiotic-in fact when I got the bladder infection, one doc told me to remain on the amoxicillin. It was only after my follow-up exam after my hysterectomy with the gyno guy when he scraped the infection off the wall of my vagina that I decided to go off the antibiotic myself. Taking the antibiotic made the little vag discharge I had odorless and normal in color. I had always had some clear drainage, probably since post preg. or perhaps pre. when I was on birth control(I can't really recall-so long ago). The doc told me it was because of cervixitis as my vag canal was probably too short -so the friction during intercourse caused me to have this continual drainage. My problems with IBS started with C when I was on birth control. Birth control pills have also been connected with Candida. I don't know the length of time involved as far as the bowel damage is concerned. It would depend on what symptoms you had in between. Do you have any history of vag infections?

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