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Author Topic:   Thank you all for responding, I have a few mor question
Elena
Newbie

Posts: 5
Registered: Oct 98

posted 11-03-1998 10:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elena     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
In relation to the comments on eating smaller amounts of food more frequently, are you suggesting that the nervous system of the stomach otherwise gets agitated when it has large quantities of food and goes wild?
I heard that with IBS you can have a problem getting all the nutrients you would typically bec. it just comes out of a person too quickly, is there truth to this?
Normally as soon as food hits a person's stomach is it suppose to cause an immediate reaction in the intestines? If so, is what we are experiencing just a normal reaction intensified tremendously resulting in a lot of pain plus whatever else?

IP:

flux
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posted 11-03-1998 11:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for flux   Click Here to Email flux     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
There are two things that I can think of.

1) The stomach nerves are sensitive to distention. This can make a person *feel* bloated even though the person is not necessarily physically bloated.

2) The stomach does not empty as quickly as it should. This is called delayed gastric emptying. In this case, the stomach probably does become physically bloated. In severe cases, nausea and vomiting occur.

Smaller meals probably can help, especially if the first reason is the cause.

There is probably no truth to losing nutrients, except perhaps some water and probably insignificant quantities of electrolytes.

It is correct that when a person eats or even the sight or smell of food will cause what is called the gastrocolic reflex, and studies have found this effect exaggerated in some of those suffering from IBS.

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K
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posted 11-04-1998 07:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for K   Click Here to Email K     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Hi Elena. The reason that eating smaller amounts of food helps is because when the stomach receives large amounts of food, it signals the intestines to speed up, faster than they would go with small amounts of food. And yes, when you eat even a little bit of food, your stomach signals the intestines that they better clear out, to make way for the new food to be digested. This is why you may find that you have to go to the bathroom soon after eating. Those of us with IBS are thought to have an "overactive" colon, that is, it propels the food thru faster than a normal colon. As for the nutrients, usually, people with IBS don't have a problem with that. Most of the absorption of nutrients is done before the food hits the colon, which is the part that is causing the problem. We do have to worry about dehydration and electrolyte loss however, if we have really bad D. Just make sure you drink lots of water, or a sports drink like Gatorade. Hope this answers some of your questions! K

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flux
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posted 11-04-1998 09:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for flux   Click Here to Email flux     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
I don't think the size of the meal makes any difference in the response of the gastrocolic reflex.

As far as clearing the intestines out, that happens only when the stomach is empty.

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K
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posted 11-05-1998 12:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for K   Click Here to Email K     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Whenever you ingest food, it stimulates peristalsis, which is the muscular contractions that propel food through the gastrointestinal system. So, when you eat, it causes the stomach and intestines to contract, moving any food that is present in the GI system down into the colon, and into the rectum, causing the person to have a bowel movement when enough feces fills the rectum. This doesn't only happen when the stomach is empty, when there is food in the stomach, this is happening anyway!

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flux
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posted 11-05-1998 01:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for flux   Click Here to Email flux     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
When you eat two things occur. First, the gastrocolic reflex causes the colon to have contractions. This is a short-lived effect, probably lasting no more than 30 minutes. The amount of food probably does not affect this. In fact, you can probably make it happen by just looking or smelling food. After that the entire digestive system goes into a fed state where most of the contractions stop. The stomach's contractions also change to begin its storage and digestive role in the food.

However, most of what we know about the gut's activities is what happens when it is empty. That's when MMCs occur.

IP:

DocJ
unregistered
posted 11-05-1998 07:35 AM           Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
The perception of bloating is probably more perception than any derangement in gastric wall compliance or gastric emptying- at least in IBS. Clinically, and on average, IBS patients respond to small, low fat meals.

By definition, gastric emptying is normal in IBS. This is easily assessed.

There is no malabsorption in IBS (by definition).

The mechanism of the "gastrocolic reflex" is uncertain. Eating clearly results in a variety of propulsive colonic contractions. It is unclear exactly what the role of the stomach is in this as similar responses are seen in people who have had gastrectomy.

Feeding results in a definable motor pattern in the small bowel characterized by contractions of variable amplitude superimposed on small changes in tone. While this is not the migrating organized activity of MMC's, it is an important, and not quiescent, event. Assessment of antroduodenal motor activity involves determination of both MMC's and conversion to a fed state as important parameters in determining normality.

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Elena
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Posts: 5
Registered: Oct 98

posted 11-05-1998 09:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Elena     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
I am not clear on what was meant by bloating being a perception. Do you mean A perception of the stomach that results in bloating or a perception by the individual that he is bloated when in fact he isn't?

I have many times seen my stomach be bloated when i have not had much to eat, i do not think this is normal.

I am not clear on what was meant by:
"As far as clearing the intestines out, that happens only when the stomach is empty."

Is the pain that a person experiences due to the contractions that are happening?

I hear a lot of people talking about D., but i do not always have that, it seems to depend on how long i wait and endure the pain before i actually go to the bathroom.

What is also very common in my experience is that i can have very bad cramps and then all of a sudden they will go away like there was nothing wrong and a short time will pass and the cramps come back out of no where and are progressively worse at each interval. Is this common?

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dfairbee
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Posts: 133
Registered: Jul 98

posted 11-05-1998 11:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dfairbee   Click Here to Email dfairbee     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
docj---that was almost poetic,so good to have back...norma

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flux
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posted 11-05-1998 11:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for flux   Click Here to Email flux     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Perecption is a complex issue that involves the sensory nerves of the gut and the brain that makes a person feel bloated.

Actually being bloated, something that is measurable with a tape measure, is a physical thing, and not the same thing. Delayed gastric emptying can cause that by holding the contents of the stomach in place longer than normal. Swallowed air could also accumulate at this time.

When the stomach is empty (many hours after a meal), the gut engages in a series of contractions called the migrating motor complex (MMCs for short). These contractions clear out the intestine of any remaining contents.

More and more, it is believed that the pain in IBS is result of hyperactive sensory nerves. It is not clear exactly how much of the motor activity is abnormal or how much that contributes to the pain.

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K
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Posts: 314
Registered: Oct 98

posted 11-06-1998 12:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for K   Click Here to Email K     Edit/Delete Message Reply w/Quote
Elena-- this happens to me too. If I ignore my cramps, they usually go away, only to return in a few minutes. If I'm correct, the cramps you feel are due to spasms of the colon, which cause the diarrhea.

IP:

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IBS & the Mind-Body/Brain-Gut Connection, by William B. Salt II, MD